The Microbiome and Multiple Sclerosis

The following article was prepared by the Dr Clark Research Association, David P. Amrein

The Importance of the Intestinal Flora on the example of Multiple Sclerosis

I frequently write about the importance of the intestinal microbiome, because it is becoming ever more clear how important the intestinal flora is for human health. A recent TED Talk by Dr. Terry Wahl is another lead in this direction: Herself a physician, she was able to get rid of her progressing Multiple Sclerosis only after changing to a diet resembling the paleo diet, i.e. low on carbs such as sugar and grains, and high on fat and plants, thereby positively influencing her intestinal flora. The TED Talk can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLjgBLwH3Wc

But it is not just one patient’s testimonial that backs up this connection: Studies with mice have shown that if a healthy human’s intestinal flora was transplanted into a mouse, it would stay healthy, but if an MS sufferer’s intestinal flora was transplanted, the mouse too would develop symptoms of MS (http://www.pnas.org/content/114/40/10719.full.pdf?with-ds=yes).

Furthermore, comparisons of the intestinal flora between identical twins, of which one suffered from MS and the other did not, indicated differences in the intestinal flora. There seems to be truth to the old naturopathic wisdom that “all disease comes form the guts”.

The importance of the intestinal flora goes way beyond what had previously been assumed: for example does it seem to even influence mental health significantly; see this report in Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/518S13a?foxtrotcallback=true. Certain bacteria can even metabolize drugs and render them useless when taken, as a recent study has shown (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/357/6356/1156)

Many nowadays have a damaged intestinal flora because of the consumption of antibiotics. But the one factor most detrimental to a healthy intestinal flora is a bad diet. The obvious conclusion is that to stay healthy we should eat a good diet, and that would be one high in plants and low in carbs, especially grains and sugars.

While there are indeed many probiotic products available from Chemists and supermarkets, always consult a qualified natural health practitioner to ensure proper assessment and quality products.  Call True Medicine to arrange your personal health assessment on 07 55301863.

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